Part I: Standing Wave – Superposition with Reflected Wave 1. Where would you expect the nodes to be?

Part I: Standing Wave – Superposition with Reflected Wave

1. Where would you expect the nodes to be?  —Select—

 About half the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave.

 Where the wave amplitude is highest or lowest.

 Where the incident wave crosses the centerline.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave.

 is in phase with the incident wave.

 is out of phase with the incident wave.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave at the antinodes, zero at the nodes.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave at the nodes, zero at the antinodes.

2. Where would you expect the antinodes to be?  —Select—

 About half the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave.

 Where the wave amplitude is highest or lowest.

 Where the incident wave crosses the centerline.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave.

 is in phase with the incident wave.

 is out of phase with the incident wave.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave at the antinodes, zero at the nodes.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave at the nodes, zero at the antinodes.

3. About how high do you expect the resultant wave to be?  —Select—

 About half the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave.

 Where the wave amplitude is highest or lowest.

 Where the incident wave crosses the centerline.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave.

 is in phase with the incident wave.

 is out of phase with the incident wave.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave at the antinodes, zero at the nodes.

 About double the amplitude of the incident or reflected wave at the nodes, zero at the antinodes.

4. Describe the image produced by the simulation.  —Select—

 The reflected wave is in phase with the incident wave.

 The resultant wave is twice the amplitude of either the incident or reflected wave at the antinode.

 At the node, the waves experience destructive interference and result in a zero value.

 All of the above.

5. From the reflected wave’s leftmost point, describe the resultant wave between that point and the barrier to the right.  —Select—

 The wave has snake-like undulations.

 The wave is completely flat where the reflected wave is superpositioned.

 The wave is maximized and coherent.

6. How could this happen?  —Select—

 Complete constructive interference.

 Complete destructive interference.

 Complete cohesive interference.

 Complete interfering cohesion.

7. Notice where the nodes and antinodes are located (N and A, respectively) along the centerline. Can a node and antinode have the same value at any time?  —Select—

 Yes–destructive interference can cause the antinodes to have a zero value when the waves are completely out of phase.

 No–nodes are always zero and antinodes are always non-zero.

 

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Part I: Standing Wave – Superposition with Reflected Wave 1. Where would you expect the nodes to be? was first posted on September 4, 2020 at 11:42 am.
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